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Mandu

Fairy tale love story of a Muslim Prince with a local poor shepherd girl, brings the mythological face to Mandu. Mandu is a celebration in stone, of life and joy, of the love of the poet-prince Baz Bahadur for his beautiful consort, Rani Roopmati. Under Mughal rule, Mandu was a pleasure resort, its lakes and palaces the scenes of splendid and extravagant festivities and the glory of Mandu lives on, in legends and songs, chronicled for posterity.

Perched along the Vindhya ranges at an altitude of 2,000 feet, Mandu, with its natural defenses, was originally the fort capital of the Parmar rulers of Malwa in 11th and 12th century, then known as Mandhavgarh. Towards the end of the 13th century, it came under the sway of the Sultans of Malwa, the first of whom named it Shadiabad - 'city of joy'. And indeed the pervading spirit of Mandu was of gaiety; and its rulers built exquisite palaces like the Jahaz and Hindola Mahals, ornamental canals, baths and pavilions, as graceful and refined as those times of peace and plenty.

Mandu has over 40 monuments which are divided into three broad categories: the Central Village Group, the Royal Enclave Group, and the Rewa Kund Group.

Antiquity and Artistry merges here to bring the some of the marvelous structures, the massive gateways to Mandu is an example of this ancient artistic excellence.

Mandu is one of the few places where the very rare Baobab tree grows.